Google Chrome accessibility update

Posted on Monday, 16 July 2012 by Steve Faulkner

Google Chrome has come a long way in the past 3 years, and the improvements definitely extend to accessibility support. The Google Access team have been working hard to make Chrome more accessible to a range of users.

Google Chrome accessibility

You can read about the technical details of Chrome keyboard, low vision and screen reader support in the Accessibility Technical Documentation. Suffice to say from a technical view point Chrome is almost up there with Internet Explorer on Windows, but still has a way to go to reach Firefox’s level of accessibility support. On OSX and iOS it’s close to Safari’s level of support.  On Linux Firefox is still the only choice. The technical improvements strongly suggest Chrome is nearing practical support for users with disabilities, but that can only be confirmed by the users themselves.

Chrome still has a way to go in regards to HTML and ARIA implementation and improved support for new HTML5 features is required, but the commitment is there and the work is being done. The people responsible deserve congratulations for their efforts to date and the hope is it will continue apace. Like browser development in general, accessibility support involves continuous work.

Chrome Frame

Chrome Frame pretty much inherits all improvements in HTML and ARIA support found in Chrome. A notable exception is that it does not support Windows High Contrast mode as this is provided in Chrome by a High Contrast extension.

Further Reading


About Steve Faulkner

Steven is the Senior Web Accessibility Consultant and Technical Director, TPG Europe. He joined The Paciello Group in 2006 and was previously a Senior Web Accessibility Consultant at Vision Australia. He is the creator and lead developer of the Web Accessibility Toolbar accessibility testing tool. Steve is a member of several groups, including the W3C HTML Working Group and the W3C Protocols and Formats Working Group. He is an editor of several specifications at the W3C including HTML 5.1, Using WAI-ARIA in HTML and HTML5: Techniques for providing useful text alternatives. He also develops and maintains HTML5accessibility

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